No mere mortals (December 31, 2017)

Merry Christmas!

It’s a great joy to be with you all this weekend. With our priest rotation schedule, I look forward to my quarterly Masses here and I was excited to see that I’d be coming up in the Christmas season. It is good to be with you.

During this time, we spend the holidays with family and it seems especially appropriate that the solemnity of the Holy Family lands as it does. Folks come from far away or after much time to be with us and we with them. And generally speaking, it’s a good time….but not without it’s difficulties either! There is no one like family that can push our buttons, no?

So it’s good that we have this solemnity and this opportunity to reflect on the Holy Family. Because there is something amazing going on here, in the birth of Christ, in the Word made flesh.

When we talk about God, we often (rightly!) dwell on how immense, how grand, how far beyond us He is. There is so much that we don’t understand – though there are hundreds (thousands?) of books written about God in general and each of the three Persons of the Trinity. And yet, all of those books only capture a tiny fraction of the wholeness of God. And yet, this God who can not be contained becomes one of us. He becomes a child, an infant.

Over the holidays, I was able to spend time with my own family. We had a particular celebration with my brother and sister-in-law, who have been expecting for quite a while and finally welcomed their second son (Oliver) the week before Christmas. Our family gathered around them after Christmas to meet him and celebrate with them.

As he made his way from person to person, I got a chance to hold the little guy myself. If you’ve ever held a child, you’ll probably agree that one of the immediate impressions is how fragile infants are! Everything about them is miniature, vulnerable. And in their state of complete dependence – only able to eat, sleep, and fill their diapers – they are yet a great gift.

Having passed through that time in life and entered into adulthood, I don’t know if I would willingly go back into such a time where I was so vulnerable – being clothed, held, wiped, and fed by another, totally dependent on those around me.

Now consider God – Him who created us, Who formed all of creations – and He becomes an infant. He becomes vulnerable, breakable, contained, a little child. Consider the great humility and love that He must have!

I was online this week and came across a quote from my favorite author, C.S. Lewis, from his book The Weight of Glory:

It is a serious thing to live in a society of possible gods and goddesses, to remember that the dullest most uninteresting person you can talk to may one day be a creature which, if you saw it now, you would be strongly tempted to worship, or else a horror and a corruption such as you now meet, if at all, only in a nightmare. All day long we are, in some degree helping each other to one or the other of these destinations. It is in the light of these overwhelming possibilities, it is with the awe and the circumspection proper to them, that we should conduct all of our dealings with one another, all friendships, all loves, all play, all politics. There are no ordinary people. You have never talked to a mere mortal. Nations, cultures, arts, civilizations – these are mortal, and their life is to ours as the life of a gnat. But it is immortals whom we joke with, work with, marry, snub, and exploit – immortal horrors or everlasting splendors.

Do you think of yourself that way? When you look in the mirror, do you see an everlasting splendor? Too often, don’t we instead look in the mirror and see a litany of flaws and critiques? So too we have a similar litany about others.

This is why the Word became Man. This is why Jesus came to us, humbling Himself to enter our family – not only the Holy Family, but the human family. So that we might recognize in Christ Himself, in His great love for us, that we are beloved, that we are treasured, that we are not ‘mere mortals’ – that we are sons and daughters of God.

Why does Jesus enter into the human family? So that one day we might be made ready, be made worthy, and eagerly so, enter into the family of God!

I don’t know if we’ll ever hold Jesus as a baby, or what Heaven will be like. But we each have the opportunity to hold Christ right here at the altar, again we find Him vulnerable, easily broken. God who can not be contained, who can not be held in any building or even all of Creation, chooses to come in our midst in the celebration of the Mass.

When you hold the Eucharist in your hands or on your tongue, think how fragile, how easily broken, desecrated, spilled, or even crushed underfoot He could be! Why does He risk this? Because in the best of moments, when we receive worthily, when we invite Jesus into our bodies and hearts, we allow Him to transform us – as the Word became Man we become one with God.

This is the mystery we celebrate in Christmas, in the Holy Family, in every Mass. Are you willing to become as vulnerable as Jesus? Perhaps not yet! But this is the invitation of Jesus – that we would place ourselves entirely in God’s hands, presenting even those parts that are yet shameful, sinful, needing healing. Jesus humbly presents Himself in the hopes that we might be inspired to trust Him enough to do the same in return.

May we ask Him to help us. That we would allow Him to be part of our family, and that we might take Him up on the invitation to be part of the family of God. May we hold Christ near to our hearts – and allow Him to hold us near His.